Let’s talk about what it means to connect with your customers. Every time someone comes to your store or restaurant, visits your website or Facebook page, and every time they buy from you, they have a customer experience. (This applies to nonprofit organizations and municipalities, too where the customer is a donor, volunteer, client, community resident or vendor.) You have a lot of influence on whether they have a good experience or not. When customers have a good experience you have a great opportunity to encourage them to continue engaging with your business and building a long term relationship.

Customers make ALL the choices that determine your success.

There’s a new acronym–CX. Have you seen it? It stands for ‘Customer Experience’. When you are in business, customers make ALL the choices that determine your success. They choose whether or not to shop at your store or call your service; whether or not to buy from you; whether to recommend you to their friends or not; and they decide if or when they will return for more. The good news is that as a business owner, YOU make all the choices that determine your customers’ experience.

The kind of experience your customers have with your business or brand goes a long way in determining whether they will be loyal or connect with your business. Of course we all know that if they have a bad experience they will engage as our biggest anti-fans ever. That’s where those bad reviews on Yelp and Facebook come from–that one person we ignored. Yikes.

I had this dreadful customer experience the other day at a book store far, far away.  I get annoyed every time I think about it and, of course, I will not engage with the store ever again (at least that is how I feel today).  There were signs ‘buy one get one free’. What a great sale for a reader! I happily shopped for several books and spent a bit of time in the store.  At check out, the books did not ring up on sale. The cashier asked for my money. I reminded her the books were on sale.  She showed me that they did not ring up on sale. I reminded her the books were on sale…and on it went. Not once did she try to solve the problem, such as call a manager or ask another cashier to help fix it. Not once did she even sound like she cared. My choice as a customer was to pay full price or not. I chose not. Yes, I guess I am THAT customer, but she lost her company a $50 sale and a lot of future business.

So, as you can see, customer experience can lead to keeping or losing customers and customer retention is a very big deal. Harvard Business claims that increasing customer retention by just 5% will increase your sales 25%-95% a year.  That is a lot of money to let walk out the door. According to a recent Gallup Poll, customers are 9 times more likely to engage with a brand whose service they rate as ‘courteous, willing and helpful’ than those who are not.

How would your customers rate their experience with your business, your products, your employees? Would they say you are courteous, willing and helpful? People will love your business if you take care of them. It is really simple. Just smile, like you are glad they dropped by, act like you care that they enjoy their time with you and be sure to help them spend their money on whatever it is they want. So many businesses do not make people feel special that it is pretty easy to beat your competitors simply by teaching your employees how to smile and say, “hi” to everyone who comes through the door. Beyond that, perhaps you can work to make sure every employee knows how to help solve customers’ problems or at least look like they are trying.

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